Pain, Brexit, Reality

I hate pain because it tells me that something is wrong.

I’d much rather live in pain than do something about it.

Inertia is a powerful force.

Pain ruins my day.

Pain means I have to take time off and fix it.  I don’t want to take time off.  I want my life to be the same.  I’ve got my routines down.

And so it is with Brexit and the elites who chose to remain.

They’d rather the referendum go away.

They’ve got their routines down, and, well, this jolt of pain is getting in the way.

After all they’re doing well.

And so the leaders do what we all when confronted by pain – denial.  

It’s not there. The  pain is not there.  

In short order, denial specialists are sent out to the body politic to do what they do best – deny.

Brexit was a fluke.  People don’t want it. The people who voted for it shouldn’t have voted – they were too old.  They were racist; this is not who we are.

Yet the pain was there – is there.  

It takes time for the mind, the political class,  to accept this.  

It’s easier to deny its existence until reality sets in that the pain is there and is not going away.

The pain is not going away because the pain is not the problem.  

Analgesics are not the answer.

The pain is a symptom of a more nefarious process, and the nefarious process that has gone on in England for some time now is the neglect of the working class.

Talking about the neglect won’t make it go away.  This is another mechanism of denial that we humans engage in. 

We move past the stage of denial and come to recognize that the pain is there but then fool ourselves that talking about it is a solution. 

Leaders then send out emissaries to working class areas to “discuss” the problem.

Help is on the way.

Yet this promise is false because the leadership fails to comprehend the faulty assumptions that produced the problem in the first place.

The neglect of the working class came about because there are people in your society who do not have the desire or the ability to work in the services industry.  These people need manufacturing jobs, of which fishing and farming is a part, today and tomorrow.

The idea that Britain and all its citizens will be executives to the world and that the people in China and Southeast Asia will be content to make your plastic cups forever is errant.

The current EU does not address this reality.  Nor does the political class.

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